Skip to content

Celebrating Good Times with Chilled Peaches in White Wine

2011 September 1

Our dressers-really wanted to say babies but thought that would be too weird…even for me- have sold! A nice, young couple in St. Louis Park, MN, who happen to be moving to NYC next week, purchased both through etsy after coming to see them the night before. Tuesday night was the first of our deliveries. We could really use a sprinter van since this requires two trips. We don’t mind but it doesn’t scream professional and efficient. But get this, the dressers are basically the only furniture they are bringing. That is infinitely cool and flattering. Since we’ve been in the nice area of St. Louis Park (and Uptown), we decided to take advantage and dine out/stop by stores we don’t have around Northfield.

Heirloom tomatoes

Last night was Burger Jones (recommended by the buyers) and our next trip involves Whole Foods and a few other places along the lakes. The guy on the Burger Jones sign looks like Greg and his mom’s maiden name is Jones. I had a caprese burger with mozzarella, pesto and an heirloom tomato on a ciabatta bun. We shared an order of poutine (“hand-cut fries smothered with rich beef gravy, chopped bacon & cheese curds”) which was rich and best divided amongst many more than two. But I don’t need to tell you how wonderful that was if you read what the traditionally French and big-in-Montreal dish holds. Bacon, I’m there. Greg had “the Hangover” with bacon, cheddar, hot sauce and a fried egg. I know! Washed that down with a pint of Surly beer (local). All was delicious and healthy (wink wink). We both ate half of our sandwiches and a fraction of the poutine.

So the hubs and I have been in Dresser Land for a long time but I’ve been able to make some knockout recipes. (I’m avoiding the fact that my 29th birthday is Monday, Labor Day. Being busy helps. Happy birthday to my mama the day before!) Over the weekend were individual-sized mascarpone cheesecakes with amaretti cookie crust and a red wine, rosemary and fig compote. A little creation I whipped up using the vanilla bean paste I picked up at a specialty store while on vacation.

My purple produce

Like I mentioned last week, I’ve been using the most delicious tomatoes of the year…even though 5 heirloom tomatoes cost over $15 at our local co-op. (Had I read the correct sign, I might have passed but then again, not very many heirlooms come around here….which needs to change.) With two of those, I made simple mayo, salt, pepper, and tomato on ciabatta open-faced sandwiches topped with a few splashes of balsamic vinegar. Another tomato went into my eggplant, chickpea, mint and feta salad we had late for dinner Monday (there was a purple theme to that dish) with a glass of wine to celebrate the purchase of both pieces. Sunday, our new neighbor invited us across the hall to his chili dinner where we met his brother and brother’s lady friend. Nice guy. I have doubts on his call that he is not a cook-it was spicy, flavorful and his dedication to simmer all day aroused my suspicions.

Now that my favorite month is here, September, and the temp is high today, I want to share an Orangette recipe for chilled peaches in white wine. I waited for just the perfect, firm yet ripe peach and when that didn’t come, I went ahead and made this simple summer treat. Still great but decent peaches would have made it that much better. I agree with Molly, use a crisp, light white wine (Sauvignon Blanc/Pinot Gris for example).

Chilled Peaches in White Wine from Molly at Orangette
Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients:
8 ripe peaches (firm and meaty)-white, yellow or a mix, washed and dried
4 tbsp sugar
1 bottle (750 ml) crisp, dry white wine such as, Sauvignon Blanc/Pinot Gris

Thinly slice the peaches, about 16 per peach, and combine them with the sugar in a bowl. Toss to mix then add the wine and toss again gently. Cover and refrigerate for several hours or a few days if you have the time. Serve the peaches chilled with some of the liquid. Dreamy. (If you want, add a sliced vanilla bean and toss to release the seeds then refrigerate.)

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Note: You can use basic XHTML in your comments. Your email address will never be published.

Subscribe to this comment feed via RSS